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IACP Blog

Are we listening? What clients say they want. (Part 4 of 8) -- Respect: Clients value it, but do we understand how to provide it?

By: Robert M. Arthur, Member IACP Research Committee

At least in my practice group, we stress the respectfulness of the Collaborative Process as a differentiating factor compared to other divorce processes. Our clients seem to have heard that message, because it was the top reason that clients chose a Collaborative Divorce Process, according to the most recent IACP research study, the Divorce Experience Study. In that study, 78% of respondents who chose Collaborative for their divorce said that they chose Collaborative because it was a “more respectful process.”

Are we listening? What clients say they want. (Part 2 of 8) - Clients Tell Us That Process is Very Important, and Suggest a More Nuanced Understanding of Process is Needed

By Linda Wray, Co-Chair IACP Research Committee

The Little Old Lady Carrying a Brown Suitcase - A Collaborative Divorce success story

Recently, I was invited to a client lunch with a financial adviser trained in Collaborative Practice, with whom I work,  and to whom I've referred several clients for assistance in both Collaborative matters and mediations.   To my surprise and delight, I was seated at the table next to a former client (*Mary).  To say that I did not recognise her would be an understatement.  She literally looked like a new woman, and not because she had aged during the approximately eight years since I worked with her.

COLLABORATIVE DIVORCE: A SIMPLE IDEA

Have you heard of Collaborative Divorce?  We sure hope so.  As the leading Collaborative Divorce organization, the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals seeks to educate the public and family law professionals about this unique process.  And yet, we know we have a long way to go to compete with the traditional court-based divorce that has been made famous in movies like War of the Roses and Kramer versus Kramer.