IACP Blog

Where Are You on Your Collaborative Journey

Known forever in family law is litigation, the often-quick fallback to failed lawyer-managed negotiation. Negotiations fail (if attempted at all), then go to court and duke it out in front of the judge and may the best parent win.

Then along can Stu Webb from Minnesota in the early 1990’s and he changed all that.

With a simple letter he indicated he would no longer litigate yet continue to take on family law cases. The proviso was, he wouldn’t go to court.

A Part of Me is Confused: Internal Family Systems and Negotiations

Let us imagine some typical settlement meetings.

Client’s Ambivalence

I looked at her with a stunned look on my face when my client said “yes” to the offer her husband had proposed. Just moments before, she said “No way in hell.” What had changed?

Are we listening? What clients say they want. (Part 4 of 8) -- Respect: Clients value it, but do we understand how to provide it?

By: Robert M. Arthur, Member IACP Research Committee

At least in my practice group, we stress the respectfulness of the Collaborative Process as a differentiating factor compared to other divorce processes. Our clients seem to have heard that message, because it was the top reason that clients chose a Collaborative Divorce Process, according to the most recent IACP research study, the Divorce Experience Study. In that study, 78% of respondents who chose Collaborative for their divorce said that they chose Collaborative because it was a “more respectful process.”